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Help in a crisis

Please note that the following numbers are for use in an emergency only. This service is predominantly for service users currently in our care, their families and carers. If you are not currently in our care you can either contact your GP, go to your nearest Accident and Emergency Department.

or

Alternatively contact the crisis team directly where your needs will be assessed and you will be advised accordingly.

Please visit our get in touch section if your enquiry is not urgent.

 

Contacting our Crisis Teams

If you are in Gloucestershire, please call:  0800 1690398

The number is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. When calling, please choose one of the following options depending on your location:

  • Option 1 for Stroud and Cotswolds
  • Option 2 for Gloucester and Forest 
  • Option 3 for Cheltenham, Tewkesbury and North Cotswolds

Please note: telephone calls may be recorded. If you do not want that to happen, please tell the person who answers your call and they will phone you back on a ‘non-recordable’ telephone.

If you are in Herefordshire, please call: 01432 364046

 

Is this the first time you have needed help for a mental health crisis?

If you, a friend, or a relative is experiencing mental health problems for the first time and need emergency treatment or advice during office hours, then you should contact your GP.

Alternatively contact the crisis team directly where your needs will be assessed and you will be advised accordingly.

NHS Choices

If you don’t have a GP, use the NHS Choices service search to locate the nearest one to you.

Are you feeling vulnerable? Do you need to talk to somebody now?

If so, there are some people that can help you immediately.

Call free on 116 123

If you are experiencing feelings of distress or despair, including those which could lead to suicide, you can call the Samaritans.

Call free on 0800 11 11

If you are a child or a young person you may want to speak to Childline.

Call 0808 816 0606

A safe, supportive, non-judgmental and informative service for people who self harm, their friends, families and carers.

Personality disorders

If you think you may have a personality disorder or already have a diagnosis, ²gether can help. Find out more about the services we offer below.

What are personality disorders?

Personality disorders are conditions in which an individual differs significantly from an average person in terms of how they think, perceive, feel or relate to others.

Changes in how a person feels and distorted beliefs about other people can lead to odd behaviour, which can be distressing and may upset others.

Common features include:

  • being overwhelmed by negative feelings such as distress, anxiety, worthlessness or anger
  • avoiding other people and feeling empty and emotionally disconnected
  • difficulty managing negative feelings without self-harming (for example, abusing drugs and alcohol, or taking overdoses) or, in rare cases, threatening other people
  • odd behaviour
  • difficulty maintaining stable and close relationships, especially with partners, children and professional carers
  • sometimes, periods of losing contact with reality

Symptoms typically get worse with stress. People with personality disorders often experience other mental health problems, especially depression and substance misuse.

On this page

Getting help

If your mood is affecting your daily life, you should seek help as soon as possible.

Treatments for OCD

How we may help, and some of the treatments on offer.

Our teams and services

Where to find us, and which services can help you.

Living with a mental health condition

Information for patients and carers on the wider aspects of living with a mental health condition.

Information for carers

Support for you in your caring role.

Information for professionals

Notes on services, contacts and treatments for healthcare professionals.

Further help and support

Other organisations who can help or who partner with us.

News & views

News stories linked to this and related conditions.

Other conditions & services

The rainbow of conditions ²gether NHS helps with.

Getting help

If your mood is affecting your daily life, you should seek help as soon as possible.

If you think you may have bipolar disorder, you should visit your GP who will be able to help you further. If your GP agrees, they will refer you to our services so you can be assessed and given help and support.

Treatment for personality disorders

How we may help, and some of the treatments on offer.

Treatment for most personality disorders usually involves a course of psychological therapy. This normally lasts at least six months, often longer, depending on the severity of the condition and other co-existing problems.

You can learn more about types of personality disorders and treatments available by visiting NHS Choices.

 

Our teams and services

Where to find us, and which services can help you.

Living with a mental health condition

Information for patients and carers on the wider aspects of living with a mental health condition.

Mental illness can affect many areas of your life. This section has information on many aspects of your daily life, from physical health to work, education and recovery. Select an area below to learn more:

Five Ways to Wellbeing

At any given time, 1 in 4 of us will be experiencing a mental health issue. Some of the most common mental health conditions, such as depression, anxiety and stress, can be relieved by following some simple steps called the Five Ways to Wellbeing.

 

  • Connect with people - your family, friends, colleagues and neighbours. Speaking to people over the telephone or online can help, but there’s nothing like being in the company of others to boost your mood.
  • Get active - take a walk, go cycling, join a dance class, go swimming or play a game of football. Find an activity that you enjoy and make it a part of your life. Anything that raises your heart rate – even cleaning the house – can help.
  • Keep learning – give yourself a sense of achievement and a new confidence. Why not sign up for that cooking course, start learning to play a musical instrument, learn a new language, or figure out how to fix your bike?
  • Give - even the smallest act can count - whether it's a smile, a thank you or a kind word. Larger acts, such as volunteering at your local community centre, can improve your mental wellbeing and help you make new friends.
  • Be mindful - be more aware of the present moment, including your feelings and thoughts, your body and the world around you. Some people call this awareness ‘mindfulness’ and it can positively change the way you feel about life and how you approach challenges.

These are proven techniques to help boost your general wellbeing and they are things we can all incorporate into our daily lives. If you want to make your mental health and wellbeing a priority, following these steps is a good place to start.

Drugs and alcohol

Support in Gloucestershire

CGL Gloucestershire is a free and confidential drug and alcohol service for adults (including offenders), families, carers and affected others.

They provide information, support, advice and treatment options from three main hubs across the county - Cheltenham, Gloucester and Stroud. They also work from a range of other locations including pharmacies and community venues.

https://www.changegrowlive.org/content/cgl-gloucestershire

Support in Herefordshire

Addaction Herefordshire offers information, advice and support for people with drug and alcohol issues every weekday, and on alternative Saturdays. There is a young people’s service for those aged 11+. Their recovery-focused service has bases in Hereford as well as outreach via partner organisations. They aim to support people to overcome their issues and develop the skills necessary to go on to live a fulfilling life in recovery. They also support the families of people with substance misuse issues.

www.addaction.org.uk/services/addaction-herefordshire

Money and mental health

Money and mental health are often linked. Poor mental health can make managing money harder and worrying about money can make your mental health worse.

This website gives information about the relationship between money worries and mental health, with suggestions on how to address them.

Employment

Our Vocational Services team can help you to find work. Find out more here.

Medical records

You are entitled to see the information held in your health record. You do not have to tell us why you want to see your records.

If you wish to see a copy of your health record, please ask the person providing your care or write to: Head of Health Records, Rikenel, Montpellier, Gloucester GL1 1LY.

In your letter, give:

  • your name
  • address
  • date of birth
  • any other information which would help locate your file

Please note: there may be a charge for this service.

If you think that information in your health records may not be accurate, please notify us in writing.

Medication

Our Choice and Medication website helps you make a decision about medication and some treatments. The Trust's pharmacy service supports staff, service users and carers in achieving safe and effective management of medicines. For more information, please visit our Choice and Medication website.

Pregnancy and mental health

If you have serious mental ill health now, or have done in the past, and are pregnant or thinking of becoming pregnant, then it is important to get specialist advice.

Getting specialist advice and guidance prior to becoming pregnant will help reduce the risks for you and your baby.  There is help and support available, so don't be afraid to talk about how you are feeling with your midwife, GP or psychiatrist – they will be happy to discuss your particular problem and care with you.

Women who have had previous serious mental ill health can be at higher risk of becoming unwell during pregnancy and after birth. Mental health professionals can discuss care and treatment choices and support you to make informed choices about managing your condition, including weighing up the benefits and risks of taking medication. They will help you make a plan to look after your mental health as your pregnancy progresses and once your baby is born.

If your pregnancy is unplanned, then you should inform your care coordinator or lead mental health professional as soon as you know you are pregnant, so they can help and support you. It is important a women's mental health remains stable during pregnancy and after birth. There is increasing evidence that shows that untreated mental illness during this period can have a negative longer term effect on a baby's development.

If you are pregnant, it is important that you don’t stop your medication suddenly, unless told to do so by your doctor. Stopping treatment suddenly may cause you to become unwell again more quickly and increase the risks for you and your baby. It can also cause side effects. It may be best for you to continue your medication during your pregnancy and if you choose to breastfeed. Mental illness can sometimes impact on a women's ability to care for herself and her baby. It is also important to inform your midwife about your mental health condition and any medication you are taking. Do not treat yourself with herbal remedies without consulting your doctor.

Taking your medication whilst pregnant

If you are on medication, or specific medication has been suggested to you, the Best Use of Medicines in Pregnancy (BUMPS) website is a helpful resource. This free service gives the most up-to-date, evidence-based information for women and their families. This website is an excellent resource but please still discuss any medication changes with your doctor.

Smoking
Did you know?
  • Smoking is the primary reason for the 10 to 20 year shortened life expectancy for people with a mental health disorder. Smoking causes cancer, cardio vascular disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  • People with mental health conditions consume 42 per cent of all tobacco bought in the UK
  • Many think smoking is a mood enhancer - in fact it causes depression, stress and anxiety
  • Smokers have a 79 per cent increased risk of being diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease

These are just some of the reasons why cutting down or giving up smoking altogether can have a huge impact on improving your health and wellbeing.

How to get help quitting
  • If you are one of our service users, ask to speak to a Smokefree Champion or Quit Advisor
  • If you live in Gloucestershire, visit hlsglos.org or ring 0800 122 3788
  • You can also call the national Smokefree helpline on 0800 022 4332 (Monday to Friday 9am to 8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am to 5pm)
  • GPs can provide advice and prescriptions for nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) products and most surgeries have nurses who offer a stop smoking service
  • The national Smokefree website includes a wide range of support options and advice

Information for carers

Carers and families provide a vital support network but are at greater risk of experiencing mental and physical health problems and emotional stress themselves due to the demands of being a carer. As well as providing care and treatment for the people who use our services, we are also here to support you. If you have a problem, if something is worrying you, or if you are confused about how to get help, then please talk to us. 

On this page you will find information about your involvement in the care we provide to your relative or friend and information about support for you in your caring role.

Estimated carers in Herefordshire and Gloucestershire

Carers information booklet

The Carers information booklet is also available in Polish and Urdu.

Carers charter

Download our carers charter

Information for professionals

Notes on services, contacts and treatments for healthcare professionals.

Referral information for Gloucestershire GPs and Healthcare Practitioners

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Referral information for Herefordshire GPs and Healthcare Practitioners

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Further help and support

Other organisations who can help or who partner with us.

News and views

News stories linked to personality disorders or related conditions

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