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Help in a crisis

 

If there is an immediate danger to life, please dial 999 or go to your nearest Accident and Emergency Department.

I am in Gloucestershire

If you or someone you know needs help in a mental health crisis, call our crisis teams.

Call 0800 169 0398.

And choose one of the following options depending on your location:

  • Option 1 for Stroud and Cotswolds
  • Option 2 for Gloucester and Forest
  • Option 3 for Cheltenham, Tewkesbury and North Cotswolds

Please note: telephone calls may be recorded. If you do not want that to happen, please tell the person who answers your call and they will phone you back on a ‘non-recordable’ telephone.

The number is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Occasionally, callers may be asked to leave their name and number on an answerphone. In these circumstances, staff will return the call within one hour.

I am in Herefordshire

If you are in Herefordshire, please call: 01432 364046

The number is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

If you need help but are not in crisis, please contact your GP if in opening hours, or 111. If you don’t have a GP use the NHS service search to locate the nearest one to you. If your query is not urgent, you can find our contact details here.

Are you feeling vulnerable? Do you need to talk to somebody now?

samaritans

Call free on 116 123
If you are experiencing feelings of distress or despair, including those which could lead to suicide, you can call the Samaritans.

Stay Alive App

A pocket suicide prevention resource for the UK, packed full of useful information and tools to help you stay safe in crisis. You can use it if you are having thoughts of suicide or if you are concerned about someone else who may be considering suicide. The app can be accessed through the Apple Store, Google Play and downloaded as a pdf.

childline

Call free on 0800 11 11
If you are a child or a young person you may want to speak to Childline.

selfharm

Call 0808 816 0606
A safe, supportive, non-judgmental and informative service for people who self harm, their friends, families and carers.

This is a day in the life of an occupational therapist (OT) working with our Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) in Herefordshire:

“I arrive at the office and grab a coffee and sort through messages from parents, often about concerns or requests for support to help school understand. Returning calls and trying to catch teachers before lessons start is always a bit of a challenge.

“First appointment today with a young girl and her mum and dad. She is struggling at school with learning and socialising with others. Working with the whole family helps to see how they are together. Some roleplay helped us all to understand what happens when things go wrong and lead to her social isolation. As OTs, we are really skilled in coming up with practical strategies to manage challenges. Some cutting, sticking and laminating later for this family, they have a traffic light system to use at home and school to help her share how she feels.

“Dealing with the unexpected is part of every single day in a CAMHS team. This time, a phone call from a distressed dad whose son is struggling to come to terms with the death of a friend by suicide. Drawing on the skills of the medic and psychologist in the team, together we can support him through the grieving process.

“My skills as an OT really help to support young people to achieve success in spite of their challenges with anxiety. Planning activities so they are achievable is a really important part of what we do. This might be homework, essays, meeting friends after school or things that are more important to them, such as being able to ask for a can of Coke in the canteen.

“Helping schools to understand how best to support someone and enable their success is so important. Often, it’s about helping teachers to understand the young person’s experiences and suggest that maybe asking them to read aloud in front of the class isn’t the best thing right now. We can challenge them with that later, but first let’s give them a space where they can be confident enough to do their learning.

“At lunchtime there is time to catch up with my fellow OTs, to share knowledge about a new referral and the best approach to support a young boy who has been diagnosed with Selective Mutism following a major trauma and is struggling in school. Sharing experience and picking the brains of colleagues is always useful.

“Every day is different and being creative (another OT skill!) about how we might support a person to overcome their challenges is a great part of the role. Today, it’s running down to the radiology department at the County Hospital to take lots of photos of the department, X-ray machines and members of staff holding a board with messages of encouragement for a girl who is on the Autistic Spectrum who is trying hard to overcome a specific phobic of X-rays so she can have  important surgery.  Brilliant!

“It’s a busy, demanding job with many positives and the odd challenge or two. Now and again, things happen which remind us why we do what we do. While cycling home, I pass a young person I used to work with who is hanging out with his mates and ‘being cool’ but manages to give me a quick grin that reassures me all is still going well; phew.”

 

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