Q

Search for a condition, service or location

Translate this page

Q

Help in a crisis

Please note that the following numbers are for use in an emergency only. This service is predominantly for service users currently in our care, their families and carers. If you are not currently in our care, please contact your GP or go to your nearest A&E.

Please visit our get in touch section if your enquiry is not urgent. We recommend that you speak to your GP in the first instance.

 

Contacting our Crisis Teams

If you are in Gloucestershire, please call:  0800 1690398

Please note: from 3 April 2017 telephone calls may be recorded. If you do not want that to happen, please tell the person who answers your call and they will phone you back on a ‘non-recordable’ telephone.

The number is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Between 7am and 10pm. When calling, please choose one of the following options depending on your location:

  • Option 1 for Stroud and Cotswolds
  • Option 2 for Gloucester and Forest 
  • Option 3 for Cheltenham, Tewkesbury and North Cotswolds

 

If you are in Herefordshire, please call: 01432 364046

 

Is this the first time you have needed help for a mental health crisis?

If you, a friend, or a relative is experiencing mental health problems for the first time and need emergency treatment or advice during office hours, then you should contact your GP. Your GP is your family doctor – the doctor you would normally see if you are ill or concerned about any aspect of your health. They will be able to refer you to the most appropriate mental health service in your area.

NHS Choices

If you don’t have a GP, use the NHS Choices service search to locate the nearest one to you.

Are you feeling vulnerable or need to talk to somebody now?

If so there are some people that can help you immediately.

Call free on 116 123

If you are experiencing feelings of distress or despair, including those which could lead to suicide, you can call the Samaritans.

Call free on 0800 11 11

If you are a child or a young person you may want to speak to Childline.

Equality and Diversity

Our Trust is committed to delivering fully inclusive mental health and learning disabilities services for the community we serve. We are also fully committed to ensuring our staff work in an environment that is free from discrimination. Equality and diversity is central to our values and the provision of our services.

As part of the NHS we are a public sector organisation with a statutory duty to ensure equality, diversity and human rights are embedded in everything we do, as required by the Equality Act 2010, the Human Rights Act 1998 and the NHS Constitution.

The Equality Act 2010 replaced all previous equalities legislation and introduced a general public sector equality duty which all public bodies including the NHS have to meet. The general duty has three aims and requires public bodies to have due regard to the need to:

  • eliminate unlawful discrimination, harassment and victimisation and other conduct prohibited by The Equality Act 2010
  • advance equality of opportunity between people from different groups
  • foster good relations between people from different groups. This involves tackling prejudice and promoting understanding between people from different groups

The Equality Act 2010 outlaws acts of discrimination against the following nine protected characteristics:

  • Age
  • Disability
  • Gender
  • Gender reassignment
  • Marriage and civil partnership
  • Pregnancy and maternity
  • Race
  • Religion or belief
  • Sexual orientation

The Human Rights Act 1998 was introduced to ensure people are treated with dignity and respect. Respect for the rights of individuals or groups is fundamental to their quality of life. The Human Rights Act has at its core the principles of FREDA – Fairness, Respect, Equality, Dignity and Autonomy. We believe that these principles are fundamental to the NHS in general and to our Trust specifically.

From 2015 NHS England introduced the Workforce Race Equality Standard (WRES). Research has shown that people from a Black or Minority Ethnic (BME) background have a worse experience of working in the NHS than white people. From this research, a series of 9 metrics have been designed to highlight any gaps between the experiences of staff from and BME background and those of white staff. By understanding the reasons for these gaps we will make progress in tackling discrimination where it exists in all its forms, promoting and encouraging a fully inclusive workforce which in turn will positively impact upon patient care. You can find the first set of WRES data by following the links.

Alongside the WRES, a revised version of the Equality Delivery System, known as EDS2 has been mandated for all NHS organisations in England. EDS2 has been designed with the intention of being a toolkit to support the identification, implementation and delivery of equality objectives. EDS2 is therefore designed to drive improvements to and accountability of services, ensure workplaces are free from discrimination and reduce inequalities in healthcare provision.

EDS2 has a set of 18 outcomes grouped into four goals, focussing on issues of concern to service users, carers and staff. Performance is analysed and measured against these outcomes. The four goals are:

  • Better health outcomes
  • Improved patient access and experience
  • A representative and supported workforce
  • Inclusive leadership

Over the coming weeks and months we will be gathering evidence and engaging with local stakeholders as we progress this major ongoing project.

Accessibility