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Help in a crisis

Please note that the following numbers are for use in an emergency only. This service is predominantly for service users currently in our care, their families and carers. If you are not currently in our care you can either contact your GP, go to your nearest Accident and Emergency Department.

or

Alternatively contact the crisis team directly where your needs will be assessed and you will be advised accordingly.

Please visit our get in touch section if your enquiry is not urgent.

 

Contacting our Crisis Teams

If you are in Gloucestershire, please call:  0800 1690398

The number is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. When calling, please choose one of the following options depending on your location:

  • Option 1 for Stroud and Cotswolds
  • Option 2 for Gloucester and Forest 
  • Option 3 for Cheltenham, Tewkesbury and North Cotswolds

Please note: telephone calls may be recorded. If you do not want that to happen, please tell the person who answers your call and they will phone you back on a ‘non-recordable’ telephone.

If you are in Herefordshire, please call: 01432 364046

 

Is this the first time you have needed help for a mental health crisis?

If you, a friend, or a relative is experiencing mental health problems for the first time and need emergency treatment or advice during office hours, then you should contact your GP.

Alternatively contact the crisis team directly where your needs will be assessed and you will be advised accordingly.

NHS Choices

If you don’t have a GP, use the NHS Choices service search to locate the nearest one to you.

Are you feeling vulnerable? Do you need to talk to somebody now?

If so, there are some people that can help you immediately.

Call free on 116 123

If you are experiencing feelings of distress or despair, including those which could lead to suicide, you can call the Samaritans.

Call free on 0800 11 11

If you are a child or a young person you may want to speak to Childline.

Call 0808 816 0606

A safe, supportive, non-judgmental and informative service for people who self harm, their friends, families and carers.

Lucy is an occupational therapist with the Trust’s Mental Health Acute Response Team. She shares a night in her life…

“I’ve just finished a night shift at the Maxwell Suite and am looking forward to sinking into bed.

“On my drive home I have been reflecting on the many conversations I’ve had during the night; with my colleagues, the police, AMHPs, doctors, the accident and emergency department, the wards, taxi drivers, service users and family members – true multi-agency working!

“Many were conversations with services users who can’t sleep because of their intrusive thoughts or voices. As an occupational therapist, my skills in understanding how mental illness can impact on the things we want to do and need to do come in really useful. They help me identify what might help. things people enjoy that might be a distraction, but also sometimes just to listen and acknowledge how tough it feels.

“There was a call from the police. They have detained someone and are on route to the Maxwell suite and we will soon need to meet them and understand how we can best support the person.

“While on my phone call I could hear a colleague talking to someone on the phone and asking how many pills they had taken and trying to gently get information about their whereabouts.

“Another colleague is on a call with carers, who are desperately trying to advocate for a loved one, while they can be heard in distress in the background.

“As I end my call, I reach over for information about where the service user might be, and call an ambulance.   Working together and supporting each is so important in this role.

“Then everything falls quiet and tea is made. The three of us on nights write up our notes, still wondering how that family are managing their distressed loved one and if the ambulance has found the other person.

“At 2am, a moment of respite, the bright office light goes off and the lamp on. Everything falls silent.

“2.30am: The front buzzer goes. The police are standing with the service user they have brought in for assessment.  They are welcomed and reassured.  Physical health checks are completed and tea and toast offered. It’s really important to remember the small things that can make a tough situation a little bit better.  The police go and the AMHP and doctor are called.  The suite bustles with people and work continues till daylight breaks.

“After a busy shift I arrive home and make a cup of tea to take to bed.  There’s something nice about sleeping in the day while my untouched cuppa goes cold.”

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